Breakout Sessions

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Breakout Sessions on Tuesday, September 21, 2004
at the University Library

 

If you wish to see descriptions of the Breakout Sessions, choose from the pull-down list below or continue to scroll down the screen.
Select Breakout Session Bodies, Genders, and Beyond: Electronic Resources for Gender Studies Electronic Resources for the Study of the Medieval World English and American Studies I: The 16th to the 18th Centuries English and American Studies II: The long 19th Century in History and Literature The Gist of GIS Humanities Computing Testbed Introduction to Social Science Data Services (SSDS) Philosophy and Social / Political Theory Research Question and Digital Resources in Psychology, Linguistics, and Related Fields Resources for the Study of Drama and Theatre Resources in Comparative Literature and Critical Theory The Stors: ARTstor and JSTOR Technology, Interdisciplinarity and Black Social Movements Technology, Research and the Social Sciences: Where do I Start? Urban Economy - Historical and Current

Breakout Sessions

Instructors

Time / Locations

Bodies, Genders, and Beyond: Electronic Resources for Gender Studies
Denise Shorey, Head, Reference Department; Kristine Thorsen, Lecturer in German Department
Forum Room, 2799, 2 South
This workshop session will focus on the broad spectrum of resources including full texts, abstracts, directories, and other electronic material available to students whose investigations lead them to study women and men, gender and sexuality, and issues of cultural identity and sexual politics. In addition to suggesting effective search strategies and optimal electronic resources for initiating an investigation or research project, the workshop will also treat specialized resources in the humanities and the social sciences depending upon participants' interests.
Electronic Resources for the Study of the Medieval World William McHugh, Reference Collection Management Librarian; Susan Phillips, Assistant Professor of English second floor,
Reference Classroom
, 2699A, 2 East
The instructors will introduce students to electronic resources central to the study of medieval European religion, history, culture, and literature. Among the resources to be discussed will be the International Medieval Bibliography, In Principio, Early English Books Online (EEBO), and the Middle English Compendium.
English and American Studies I: The 16th to the 18th Centuries Charlotte Cubbage, Bibliographer for American, English, and Comparative Literatures; Ethan Shagan, Associate Professor of History Library PC, B183, Lower Level
This session will focus upon a variety of resources for the study of Britain and America. Among the resources included will be Early English Books Online (EEBO), a large-scale digitization project for pre-1700 British publications; the English Short Title Catalogue, a bibliographic resource for identifying published materials through the eighteenth century; the Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO) and Evans Digital Editions (Series I of Early American Imprints) two other large-scale full-text digitization projects.
English and American Studies II: The Long 19th Century in History and Literature Charlotte Cubbage, Bibliographer for American, English, and Comparative Literatures; Carl Smith, Professor of English, American Studies, and History Video Theater, 2712, 2 South
This session will discuss online materials for the study of England and the United States, especially the latter, from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century. It will emphasize both bibliographical and related research resources (including several excellent resources with user fees to which Northwestern subscribes and so are available without charge to our graduate students) and a range of primary source repositories (textual, numerical, and visual) of different kinds.
The Gist of GIS Beth Clausen, Head, Government Publications & Maps Department; Juan Onesimo Sandoval, Assistant Professor of Sociology Forum Room, 2799, 2 South
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology is being used in research, teaching, and for practical applications across a very wide range of social science and humanities disciplines. This session introduces students to the data, software and other GIS resources available in the library to the Northwestern University community. Instructors will demonstrate GIS by showing the steps involved with GIS and how it is used in the research of one NU faculty member.
Humanities Computing Testbed Ruth Reingold, Assistant Dean for Computing Technology, WCAS; Claire Stewart, Head, Digital Media Services; Oliver Haynold, Graduate Student, History/German Literature Digital Media Services, Testbed, 2616, 2East
This session will introduce attendees to the Humanities Computing Testbed. This service, jointly sponsored by Weinberg and the University Library, is housed within Digital Media Services, 2East, University Library. Students can bring technology-based projects at any stage of development, from concept to production; to the testbed in search of advice, support, training and other development assistance. Testbed partners will draw upon the existing technical infrastructure in DMS and involve subject and technology experts from the library and university technology units as additional collaborators. A Humanities graduate student will also be available to assist.
Introduction to Social Science Data Services (SSDS) Ann Janda, Data Services Consultant; Christopher Taber, Associate Professor of Economics Forum Room, 2799, 2 South
Social Science Data Services (SSDS) provides access to thousands of numeric computer data files which are used for secondary analysis in the social sciences. Most of these files are acquired from the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) and the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research. Participants in this session will be introduced to, among other things, the technical consulting, access and documentation services which are provided for these data files, as well as the role that raw data analysis plays in research and teaching at Northwestern University.
Philosophy and Social / Political Theory Tom Mann, Bibliographer for Anthropology, Sociology, German and Slavic Literatures; Terry Pinkard, Professor of Philosophy and German second floor,
Reference Classroom
, 2699A, 2 East
Electronic databases provide faster and more detailed searching capabilities within disciplines, but they also enhance the interdisciplinary connections which expand the breadth of information distribution. This session will be a presentation of online resources which are essential for research in the disciplines of Philosophy and Social/Political Theory. The instructors will demonstrate how to search for electronic resources and explain how to analyze and utilize the information resources contained in these online databases, from the perspectives of a librarian and of a scholar. Some of the primary resources include: Philosopher’s Index, Past Masters, International Political Science Abstracts, and Worldwide Political Science Abstracts. Various other online resources, which are accessible from the Library’s website, will also be surveyed.
Resources for the Study of Drama and Theatre Rochelle Elstein, Bibliographer for Religion, Jewish Studies, Journalism, Dance, Performance Studies, Radio/Television/ Film, Theatre, and Communication Studies; Tracy C. Davis, Professor of Theatre, English, and Performance Studies, and Director, Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Theatre and Drama Video Theater, 2712, 2 South
This session combines text and performance aspects of drama and theatre. Participants will be introduced to electronic texts for American, Asian-American, Black, and English drama, as well as the entire Shakespeare corpus. Archives of important historical newspapers, websites of electronic databases, and links to exemplary library collections will be outlined. The Library's own electronic journals and newspapers, tools for special subjects, such as medieval English theater, and electronic dictionaries will complete this presentation.
Resources in Comparative Literature and Critical Theory Jeffrey Garrett, Assistant University Librarian for Collection Management and Bibliographer for Classics; Helmut Müller-Sievers, Professor of German and Classics and Director of the Program in Comparative Literary Studies second floor,
Reference Classroom
, 2699A, 2 East
Anglo-American e-resources for the study of literature are well covered elsewhere in our program--but what if your world doesn't stop at the English Channel, the Pacific, or the Gulf of Mexico? This session will introduce you to bibliographic tools for the study of other literatures, as well as full-text collections of literature in French, German, and Spanish. We will also look beyond the disciplinary confines of literature to include philosophers and critical theorists who shape the study of literature today, from Lessing and Voltaire to Weber, Benjamin, and Derrida.
The Stors: ARTstor and JSTOR Russ Clement, Art Librarian; Martin Mueller, Professor of English and Classics second floor,
Reference Classroom
, 2699A, 2 East
JSTOR and ARTstor are two initiatives by the Mellon Foundation that are changing the way scholars do business. The former (and earlier of the two) is a digital collection of about 400 flagship journals, mostly in the social sciences and humanities. Scheduled to expand to about 600 journals, it automatically includes all issues older than five years. For scholars in disciplines covered by JSTOR, this resource has created many opportunities, as well as moral hazard (why look elsewhere?).

ARTstor, a vast collection of 300,000 and growing high-quality and well documented images, has only recently become available at Northwestern and is still under development. For students of art, as well as for more occasional users of cultural images, this resource will dramatically lower the access costs (in time and effort) to images that are good enough for scholarly purposes.

Both JSTOR and ARTstor are "free" if you are a member of a university and unavailable if you are not. They are very good and very expensive pieces of the emerging digital scholarly infrastructure, and they illustrate the maxim that digital does more and costs more.

Technology, Interdisciplinarity and Black Social Movements Kathleen Bethel, African American Studies Librarian; Michael Hanchard, Professor of Political Science, and Director, Institute for Diasporic Studies Conference Room, 2628, 2 East
Global Mappings: A Political Atlas of the African Diaspora was a pilot project funded by the Ford Foundation to develop a map of black social and political movements of the 20th century in comparative and global perspective. As a teaching tool the Atlas is designed to enable students and scholars to situate various phenomena -- such as strikes, civil rights movements, rebellions-- against the backdrop of the modern world. Students interested in the site can have a head start on this presentation by visiting http://www.diaspora.northwestern.edu.

The interdisciplinary nature of Black Studies can be a challenge to electronic research efforts. Approaches to electronic resources for the study of the Black experience will be discussed. A survey of proprietary databases and freely available web resources will introduce the possibilities and limitations of electronic resources. An assortment of general resources for exploration of Diasporic topics will also be presented.
Technology, Research and the Social Sciences: Where do I Start? Bruce Foster, DCE Architect; Juan Onesimo Sandoval, Assistant Professor of Sociology Forum Room, 2799, 2 South
The Social Science computing cluster provides secure, scalable computing power to more than 750 users. Although Northwestern has had such a resource since 1995, a brand new cluster of 18 linux boxes now provides enhanced scalability, power, and ease of use. The cluster provides robust, large-scale distributed file service, specialty software, access to NU Library's datalib, consulting and education services. In this session, instructors will introduce participants to these resources and discuss their role in your doctoral research.
Urban Economy—Historical and Current Tom Mann, Bibliographer for Anthropology, Sociology, German and Slavic Literatures; Joel Mokyr, Professor of Economics and History Video Theater, 2712, 2 South
Urban studies is an area which involves many disciplines, so it is a good topic from which to survey available resources in the social sciences. Even limited to the economic aspects of urban studies, the sources of information are varied. This session will focus on various types of online resources, which cover the topic over varying time periods. It will explore how to locate and chose appropriate resources. Special attention will be given to the use of EconLit, Expanded Academic ASAP (also referred to as EXAC or Infotrac), Eighteenth Century Collections Online (ECCO), and Journal Storage (JSTOR). The instructors are a librarian who will demonstrate the operations of the databases and a faculty member who will explain the importance of those resources for teaching and research.
Where Disciplines Intersect: The Research Question and Digital Resources in Psychology, Linguistics, and Related Fields Leslie Bjorncrantz, Bibliographer for Education, Linguistics, Management, and Psychology; David Uttal, Associate Professor of Psychology Forum Room, 2799, 2 South
Colman's A Dictionary of Psychology defines meta-analysis as "a set of techniques for combining the results of a number of research studies and analysing them statistically as a single data set." The instructors will demonstrate library research in action using the example of a literature search on the question "Can spatial skills be trained?" as a first step in identifying studies for meta-analysis. This example is chosen because it is interdisciplinary and because it presents challenges that give us opportunities to show general, useful skills. The faculty member will highlight several key points to keep in mind when using technology to support an interdisciplinary literature search project, including the joys and frustrations of working in an online environment. The bibliographer will address each point with additional suggestions for the graduate student researcher. The discussion will include with a brief overview of databases available at Northwestern for researchers in psychology, linguistics, and related fields. The session handout will assist students in locating these databases.